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Be Kind Single Issue – June 19

 

10 Ways To Clean Up Your Community

Good deeds come in all shapes and sizes, and although these small actions may not change the world on their own, they all add up and help to make it a better place.

 

  1. Go plogging
    Just in case you’re blissfully unaware of what plogging is, in a nutshell, it’s picking up litter while you run. Not only is it the perfect excuse to strap on your trainers and get outdoors, but it’s an easy way to combine getting fit with cleaning up your local area. Next time you go on a jog, grab a bag, a pair of gloves and get plogging!
  2. Organise a litter pick
    If it’s your turn to organise an afternoon with the girls, skip the overpriced lunch and plan a litter pick. Braving the elements will help you all become more attuned with nature, and doing a slightly more unconventional activity makes it more memorable. Why not head to your local park and take advantage of the quaint café once you’ve finished, or enjoy a walk along the beach while clearing up coastline? Litteraction.org.uk is a great organisation to help you get started.
  3. Cut your waste
    It’s easy to lose track of how much food we throw away, but buying too much food causes a strain on natural resources, which can impact our communities. If you want to see first-hand how much you’re wasting, pop all of your leftovers in a bucket for a week, and see how quickly it piles up. To find easy steps to reduce your food waste, turn to page X.
  4. Catch the rain
    Water butts may not be the most glamorous accessories to have in your back garden, but they’re a small way you can help the planet. By collecting rain water and using it to replenish your garden during the dry summer months, you’ll be reducing your water use. If you don’t have the space for a water butt, reuse bath water or collect the water which usually goes straight down the drain when you’re waiting to heat up your shower.
  5. Give a makeover
    Instead of walking past a graffiti-covered wall or turning a blind-eye to a collapsing fence, take some time out to give it a new lease of life. Just make sure you get permission from your local council before you do so. You could also offer to help an elderly neighbour by tackling the weeds in their garden, or giving their house a fresh lick of paint.
  6. Reduce your emissions
    Instead of jumping in the car when you need to nip to your local shop, get some fresh air and walk. Reducing the amount you use your vehicle can seriously help to cut your carbon footprint, especially if you life share on long drives or on your commute to work.
  7. Save the pennies
    One of the easiest ways to produce less rubbish, is to buy less. All packaging needs to be recycled, or it will end up in landfill, so try to opt for items which are ‘naked’ to reduce unnecessary waste. Likewise, before you buy a product, make sure it will withstand the test of time, so you won’t need to throw it away after one or two uses.
  8. Understand your recycling
    It was only a little while ago that we thought all plastic could be recycled. Although this is the dream, we’re not quite there yet, so make sure you know for definite that the materials you’re tossing into the recycling are going in the right place – otherwise you’ll only be wish-cycling, which can be worse for the environment than sending it to landfill. Recycling rules differ depending on where in the country you are, but for more information visit recyclenow.com.
  9. Exercise your green fingers
    Spoiler alert: plants and trees aren’t just a great way to make an area look pretty – they also remove CO2 from the air and replace it with oxygen. By planting more greens – whether it’s just in your front garden, or in a public space once you’ve gained permission from your local council – you’ll be creating a welcoming environment while also giving back to the planet.
  10. Trade your veg
    If you’re fed up of having to buy your fruit and veg in pointless plastic sacks, don’t worry – we’re right there with you. An easy way around this is to clear a little space in your garden and grow your own. If you and your neighbours each take a product to grow, you can swap and trade with each other – cutting your plastic use, and making sure all your veg is organic and fertilizer-free.

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